Cabinet Grade plywood inspection

Cabinet Grade plywood inspection

Even the cabinet grade plywood ,mostly are birch grade cabinet grade plywood ,also have maple and other fancy wood species ,also have different quality levels ,some used for the inside such as shelf and carcass  ,some used for the outside of the cabinets such as face frames and door ,when inspect the cabinet grade plywood ,surface apperance is very important ,then the manufacturing defects .

Cabinet grade plywood are normally used for cabinets ,especially the kitchen cabinets ,have a very strict quality control for the quality .

1. Superior Screw Holding

The core layers of cabinet grade plywood are actually veneers of Poplar and birch (rather than a softer, secondary wood)  and form a void-free core, screws bite and hold with 100% of their threads. Conversely, traditional veneer core plywood has voids and is also made up of softer materials so screws don’t get a chance to clench the best they can. You also might find sheet goods made with MDF (medium-density fiberboard) core, and though it’s 100% solid, MDF is soft and just doesn’t have the screw-holding power  .

2. Cleaner Joinery

Tipping the hat once again to the uniform birch veneer layers of the core, you’ll get clean dadoes, rabbets, dovetails, miters, and fingers for strong and, when appropriate, great looking joints. Because the core is free of voids, your joinery also won’t suffer from glue starvation—they’ll get 100% glue coverage.

3. Improved Strength and Stability

All plywood runs the risk of warping, and the most common type of warp in plywood is bowing.Birch is not immune, it’s still a wood product.  The cross-banded layers of 0.35 mm thick birch veneer makes the sheets balanced, which promises a flatter product. However the thinner sheets, like 5.2 and 9mm, simply will not remain flat in large pieces—and this is no surprise. That’s usually not a problem though because these are usually used in applications like drawer bottoms and cabinet backs where they’re cut down to smaller sizes or captured in dadoes and rabbets. It should be obvious that the thicker sheets are more stable because they have more plies. 18mm birch in particular won’t change much in width or length, that’s why it’s great for jigs and fixtures that need to maintain accuracy over the years.​

4. Attractive Appearance

One of the fortunate benefits to  birch cabinet grade plywood , too, is that you can leave the edges exposed if you like the look. Because the core is free of voids and all birch, the exposed edges sometimes have an appearance that works for the project, and this saves you time and material—no need to spend time and effort on applying edge tape or solid edge banding unless you want to. Simply sand and finish the edges as they are. The face and back can be stained when you need a different color. Like solid birch lumber, for it to stain evenly with an oil based pigment stain you’ll need to apply a stain controller or a wash coat of de-waxed shellac. Otherwise use dye for even color. To keep the uniform, light color instead, simply finish Birch with a basic clear top coat of lacquer or polyurethane.

5. Thicker Face Veneer with Reasonable Quality

With close inspection of  birch, you should notice that the face and back veneers are remarkably thicker than the veneers you’ll see on traditional cabinet-grade plywood. Sadly, it’s well-known that cabinet grade plywood veneer faces are dismally thin, which makes them easy to damage and easy to sand through. But not so with   birch. Outer veneers are nice and thick.  As for the appearance, there are several grades of   birch available, but we most often carry the highest grade which is B/C. Plywood has two sides a face and a back—meaning one side is going to be better than the other, and they’re graded separately. B is the grade of  birch’s face, or the best side. It’s a whole-piece face with no splices, has a light and uniform color, and there are no patches, mineral streaks, knots or voids. The back side is graded C and slightly less attractive. There can be up to 6 color-matched “football” patches (about the size of a large egg), mineral streaks and small-but-sound dime-sized pin knots.

6. Accepts Paper Back Veneer for More Decorative Projects

If you like everything about   birch except its outer birch appearance (or occasional “football” patches), no problem. You can face this plywood with any kind of beautiful wood veneer. Be sure to veneer both sides to maintain its stability.

7. It’s Just the Thing for Laser Cutting and Engraving

It’s one of the few types of wood that can come in large enough sheets and yet be consistently dense through its thickness to be cut with a laser. Anything from parts for architectural models to artwork to schmaltzy engraved knick-knacks.

 

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